Colonial

The Settlement Begins

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In his book, “Profits in the Wilderness,” John Frederick Martin outlined four types of people needed to begin a successful colonial plantation in New England. You needed someone to deal with the Indians, someone who could win favor in colonial courts, someone who understood the complexities of the colonial land systems, and someone who could […]

Colonial

The Roots of Marlborough in Troubled Sudbury

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The best analysis of the men who came to Marlborough and the best analysis of the dynamics that caused them to come, is contained in the Pulitzer Prize winning book ‘Puritan Village’ by Sumner Chilton Powell. The book begins by looking at Sudbury and ends with the move of the ‘rebels’ to create Marlborough. The […]

Colonial

The Indian Legacy in Marlborough

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While the Natives in Marlborough probably were here for thousands of years, not very much can presently be seen of their presence here.  In the colonial era, the Praying Indians co-existed with the English for about 20 years.  An amazing thing to me is that the English and native villages were literally blocks apart.  I […]

Colonial

The Praying Indians

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The Praying Indians were followers of the great Puritan missionary to the Indians, Reverend John Eliot, who was pastor in Roxbury and began to seek out Indian converts in the 1640’s. By 1651, he had enough followers to begin an Indian town which they called Natick.  As the town of Natick began to grow, many […]

Photos

Our Monthly Photo Contest

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February’s winner was Michael Tyo for his great photo of the Woodland Dr. pond.  March’s theme is ‘Signs of Spring’.  Birds, bees, trees, flowers, furry creatures, new life of any type.  Our goal is ten pictures this month. Send your entries via email to pedbrodeur@gmail.com.  The best photo of each month will win a free […]

Colonial

The Indian Village of Whipsuppenicke

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  Before the Mayflower, and shortly before the Plymouth Colony was begun, there lived in this area a substantial Indian tribe. Oddly enough, the name of the settlement and the tribe they were affiliated with remain a bit of a mystery. They may have been Nipmuc, but the Nipmucs were mostly settled along the Blackstone […]